Proud of my complexity, doubtful of yours

I am proud of my complexity. Sure, some days I think about my simplicity. Invite me to get some coffee and have a good conversation and you’ve made my day. Give me politics, classical music, and a novel, and my life may feel complete.

But I also enjoy trova; stories that will never resemble my conservative, I guess, lifestyle (but feed my curious mind); guilty pleasures like Gossip Girl; … and … I ran out of things to list.

Perhaps, I’m quite simple.

But, like many others, I am proud of my thinking. I tend to wave the flag of objectivism, of reason over emotion, naively boasting of my unbiased opinions with ironic passion and a pretense of composure.

I am proud of my complex thinking. I am proud that I can have an extent of loyalty to an institution or ideal without being blinded to its shortcomings. In fact, by talking openly I want to show that complexity. Not many can do that, right?

As a complex being, one holier than thou, I patronize you when I see you sharing blatant falsehoods throughout Facebook. After all, you are not a complex thinker. And that’s okay, not everyone’s gifted.

Becoming blinded by well-fed sense of superiority, I turned into an asshole who overlooks his own fallacies and gets into an unending, useless argument on technicalities. And, emotion triumphed over reason.

I, of course, can’t accept that. So, I’ll just keep being proud of my complexity and doubtful of yours. I’ll reduce you to a couple character traits.

I am keeping my dignity and taking yours with me.

Truth and Facebook conversations

Surely I’m not the only one tired of those “political” conversations, many that in all fairness should be referred to as social, but politics is a nice dysphemism we use to avoid them when convenient. And with those incredibly useful and thought-provoking conversations we initiate and carry on painful distances, it is rarely not advantageous to escape them.

The thing is you’ll never get it right, but the other person will. You see, you just haven’t read enough or formed your own opinions. Well, perhaps you have read a lot, but only the lies they’ve been telling you. They won’t tell you the truth, someone claims, so they can continue profiting off the situation.

The other thing is that those intellectuals do know where to get their information and how much to get. They know where the reliable sources. They know the lies and the truths like the back of their hand.

Sorry, you lose. Mostly because you end up frustrated and with wasted time behind you.

They, however, are not winners. They lost, too. They didn’t get anything more than a self-congratulatory pat on the back and their ego telling them, “Go get them, champ!”

So, the third thing is: we’re all losers here.

I’m left feeling powerless. I want to know when enough information is enough or what sources are trustworthy, but we have build an empire where distrust reigns. Any small suspicious action and we are ready to claim a source is forever lying to us for whatever Machiavellian intentions they have. Yet, we readily accept and repeat what the charming prince tells us. He’s charming, right? No, he just tells you what you want to hear—the oh so harmfully satisfying confirmation bias.

I know I don’t know enough, but I know I’m tired of all these straw man arguments. Beyond that, I’m tired of knowing you’re behind that screen honestly believing you got it right, that you are the sole—perhaps, if you are that vain—possessor of truth. If only we all had your outstanding, ivy-league-worthy reasoning and research skills.

So, for those Facebook conversations, just run away from them. The leftist with the superiority complex who fills your feed with piles of sensationalist media won’t get it—the pot calling the kettle black? Please, do not even think about replying to that annoyingly, stupidly reductive right winger. They won’t get it, either.